It Could Be Amazing

I like stories about ordinary people who've done something out of the ordinary. My favourite year in history is 1912.
Pearl Hart on May 30th 1899, committed one of the last recorded stagecoach robberies in the United States.
Hart came from a privilaged background, her parents were both religious and affluent, providing their daughter with the best available education. She married young and attended The Chicago World’s Fair where her husband worked for a time. She in turn developed a fascination with the cowboy lifestyle while watching Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. After the fair ended in 1893, Hart left her husband after he became abusive and she sent thier two young children to live with her mother.

Hart worked various jobs whilst living in Arizona, however money was short, when she lost her job and soon afterwards recieved a message asking her to return home to her seriously ill mother she looked into other ways of raising money.
The robbery occurred  at a watering point near Cane Springs Canyon, Arizona. Hart had cut her hair short and took the highly eccentric act, for a Victorian Era woman, of dressing in men’s clothing. Hart worked with an acquaintance Joe Boot, and they both carried guns. The pair stopped a coach and Boot held a gun on the robbery victims while Hart took $431.20 and two firearms from the passengers. After returning $1 to each passenger, she then took the driver’s revolver. After the robbers had galloped away on their horses, the driver unhitched one of the horses and headed back to town to alert the sheriff.
Reports of the next few days vary. According to Hart, the pair took a circuitous route designed to lose anyone who followed, while making their future plans. Others claim the pair became lost and wandered in circles. Either way, a posse led by Sheriff Truman of Pinal County caught up with the pair on June 5, 1899. Finding both of them asleep, Sheriff Truman reported that Boot surrendered quietly while Hart fought to avoid capture.The novelty of a female stagecoach robber quickly spawned a media frenzy and national reporters soon joined the local press clamoring to interview and photograph Hart.After leaving prison, Hart largely disappeared from public view. She had a short lived show where she reenacted her crime and then spoke about the horrors of Yuma Territorial Prison
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Pearl Hart on May 30th 1899, committed one of the last recorded stagecoach robberies in the United States.

Hart came from a privilaged background, her parents were both religious and affluent, providing their daughter with the best available education. She married young and attended The Chicago World’s Fair where her husband worked for a time. She in turn developed a fascination with the cowboy lifestyle while watching Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. After the fair ended in 1893, Hart left her husband after he became abusive and she sent thier two young children to live with her mother.

Hart worked various jobs whilst living in Arizona, however money was short, when she lost her job and soon afterwards recieved a message asking her to return home to her seriously ill mother she looked into other ways of raising money.

The robbery occurred  at a watering point near Cane Springs Canyon, Arizona. Hart had cut her hair short and took the highly eccentric act, for a Victorian Era woman, of dressing in men’s clothing. Hart worked with an acquaintance Joe Boot, and they both carried guns. The pair stopped a coach and Boot held a gun on the robbery victims while Hart took $431.20 and two firearms from the passengers. After returning $1 to each passenger, she then took the driver’s revolver. After the robbers had galloped away on their horses, the driver unhitched one of the horses and headed back to town to alert the sheriff.

Reports of the next few days vary. According to Hart, the pair took a circuitous route designed to lose anyone who followed, while making their future plans. Others claim the pair became lost and wandered in circles. Either way, a posse led by Sheriff Truman of Pinal County caught up with the pair on June 5, 1899. Finding both of them asleep, Sheriff Truman reported that Boot surrendered quietly while Hart fought to avoid capture.


The novelty of a female stagecoach robber quickly spawned a media frenzy and national reporters soon joined the local press clamoring to interview and photograph Hart.

After leaving prison, Hart largely disappeared from public view. She had a short lived show where she reenacted her crime and then spoke about the horrors of Yuma Territorial Prison

[image]

(Source: Wikipedia)

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